About Roses from the Heart   Upcoming Events   Bonnet Patterns   

Is the first Memorial to all women sentenced to transportation as convicts to Australia (1788-1853). 25,566 cloth bonnets (taken from an 1860s servants bonnet) symbolises the women whose lives have been shrouded by a veil of amnesia for far too long.

twitter.com/cjhenri:

    MYSTERY SHIRT.
'CHERISHED BABIES' Memorial.
This special shirt arrived in the post to Dr Christina Henri this week. 
Whoever mailed the shirt forgot to include any contact details. 
Christina is keen to thank the shirt donor. 
If YOU sent this shirt please email Christina on
cjhenri@gmail.com

    MYSTERY SHIRT.

    'CHERISHED BABIES' Memorial.

    This special shirt arrived in the post to Dr Christina Henri this week. 

    Whoever mailed the shirt forgot to include any contact details. 

    Christina is keen to thank the shirt donor. 

    If YOU sent this shirt please email Christina on

    cjhenri@gmail.com

    — 1 week ago

    Bonnet tributes that have recently arrived in the post from the Grovedale Craft Group, Victoria.
    Eleven beautiful bonnets have been created by members - all to be included in Tasmanian artist Christina Henri’s Roses from the Heart Memorial.
    Thanks to all those who have made bonnets.

    — 1 week ago

    rosesfromtheheart:

    Thanks to Glamorgan SpringBay Mayor, Councillor Bertrand Cadart for the donation of one of his shirts to be used in Tasmanian artist Christina Henri’s Amphitrite Project.

    The material from this shirt will make the bonnets for the 12 children who died aboard the Amphitrite when the ship sank off the coast of Boulogne-sur-Mer 31 August 1833.

    It is extremely pertinent that Mayor Cadart’s shirt be used in the creation of these symbolic bonnets. Mayor Cadart was awarded the prestigious French medal - the National Order of Merit (l’Ordre national du Mérite) in Hobart on the 8 March this year. To realise how special this Award is one should note that there are around four million French citizens living abroad but only 18 have received this medal in 2013.

    Mayor Cadart has taken the opportunity afforded him to contribute to his new home of Australia. He arrived in Australia in 1972 and moved to Tasmania in 2000. He was elected to the Glamorgan Spring Bay Council in 2005 and he has held that position ever since. 

    The bonnets created from Mayor Cadart’s shirt will be remembering the babies and children whose lives came to an abrupt end in a watery grave on the Boulogne-sur-Mer coastline. These children did not reach their destination of Australia. Their remains are buried in Boulogne-sur-Mer.

    The photograph of Mayor Cadart was taken by renown photographer Owen Hughes.    www.owenhughes.com.au/

    Honorary Artist-in-Residence at the Cascades Female Factory Historic Site, Dr Christina Henri holds Mayor Cadart’s shirt in Yard Three of the female factory World Heritage Site. Mt Wellington looms high in the background.

    Bonnets for the 102 women who died along with their children when the Amphitrite sank are being made by French women both in France and overseas.

    — 1 week ago with 1 note

    Thanks to Glamorgan SpringBay Mayor, Councillor Bertrand Cadart for the donation of one of his shirts to be used in Tasmanian artist Christina Henri’s Amphitrite Project.

    The material from this shirt will make the bonnets for the 12 children who died aboard the Amphitrite when the ship sank off the coast of Boulogne-sur-Mer 31 August 1833.

    It is extremely pertinent that Mayor Cadart’s shirt be used in the creation of these symbolic bonnets. Mayor Cadart was awarded the prestigious French medal - the National Order of Merit (l’Ordre national du Mérite) in Hobart on the 8 March this year. To realise how special this Award is one should note that there are around four million French citizens living abroad but only 18 have received this medal in 2013.

    Mayor Cadart has taken the opportunity afforded him to contribute to his new home of Australia. He arrived in Australia in 1972 and moved to Tasmania in 2000. He was elected to the Glamorgan Spring Bay Council in 2005 and he has held that position ever since. 

    The bonnets created from Mayor Cadart’s shirt will be remembering the babies and children whose lives came to an abrupt end in a watery grave on the Boulogne-sur-Mer coastline. These children did not reach their destination of Australia. Their remains are buried in Boulogne-sur-Mer.

    The photograph of Mayor Cadart was taken by renown photographer Owen Hughes.    www.owenhughes.com.au/

    Honorary Artist-in-Residence at the Cascades Female Factory Historic Site, Dr Christina Henri holds Mayor Cadart’s shirt in Yard Three of the female factory World Heritage Site. Mt Wellington looms high in the background.

    Bonnets for the 102 women who died along with their children when the Amphitrite sank are being made by French women both in France and overseas.

    — 1 week ago with 1 note

    Margaret Reynolds and eminent Australian historian Prof Henry Reynolds have set up Tasmania’s History House.

    Margaret Reynolds has an impressive professional background. She was elected to the Senate in 1983, acted as a Minister in the Hawke Government from 1987-1990 and was made the Australian Government’s Representative on the Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation from 1991 - 1996. Since leaving Parliament in 1999 Margaret has taught Human Rights and International Politics and continued her human rights advocacy as National President of the United Nations Association of Australia. For over 40 years Margaret has passionately assisted women, working for their equality through social justice reform.

    Margaret & Henry’s Tasmania’s History House is one of Richmond,Tasmania’s oldest houses.

    The house has an intriguing history. It was built by Simon McCullough an Irish convict pardoned for his role in apprehending a murderer in 1825. It was an inn for 50 years trading as The Jolly Farmer’s Inn and then The Union Hotel.
    The property has been a private residence for 188 years.

    Margaret and Henry Reynolds have initiated the inaugural Andrew Inglis Clark lecture in celebration of the contribution made by this Tasmanian author of the draft Chapter 3 for the Australian constitution. An incredible contribution.

    Former High Court Judge Michael Kirby accepted Margaret Reynold’s invitation to give the first Andrew Inglis Clark annual address.

    In the wonderful ambience of the heritage Hobart Town Hall Michael Kirby delivered a superb tribute to Andrew Inglis Clark’s life’s work.

    Michael Kirby was introduced to the audience by Anna Reynolds (candidate as alderman for the Hobart City Council) and the vote of thanks was delivered by Hobart Lord Mayor, Alderman Damon Thomas.

    After Michael Kirby’s talk Margaretta Pos spoke of her time living in Andrew Inglis Clark’s family home, Rosebanks. Margaretta’s mention that the home may be on the market was noted by Michael Kirby who immediately gave his support to the property becoming a museum, a centre of focus on Andrew Inglis Clark’s triumphs.

    Anna Reynolds proposed the motion that Andrew Inglis Clark’s home ‘Rosebanks’ in Battery Point be purchased and devoted to providing a public spotlight on this Tasmanian’s many extraordinarily significant achievements. The audience responded with thunderous applause to this call presented by Lord Mayor Damon Thomas. 

    At an informal lunch after the lecture Tasmanian artist Christina Henri was pleased to be able to personally thank Michael Kirby for his shirt donation to her ‘Cherished Babies’ Memorial.

    Christina was fascinated that Andrew Inglis Clark was assisted in his election to the Tasmanian House of Assembly in 1878 largely through the influence of midlands owner Thomas Reibey. Thomas Reibey was the grandson of convict lass Mary Reibey whose highly successful life story is so well known. Thomas was Tasmania’s Premier (20 July 1876 - 9 August 1877).

    Thank you to Tasmania’s History House for taking the initiative to honour Andrew Inglis Clark.

    — 1 week ago

    Glamorgan/SpringBay Council Mayor, Councillor Bertrand Cadart has donated one of his shirts to Tasmanian artist Christina Henri to be converted into christening bonnets in memory of the 12 children who died when the Amphitrite sank 3/4 mile off the coast of Boulogne-sur-Mer on the 31 August 1833. 

    The bonnets for the 12 children will be made from material including Mayor Cadart’s shirt; mother-of-pearl buttons sourced by NSW collector Susan Brown; French lace acquired by Sybille Cuvelier in France for artist Christina Henri and French ribbon Christina bought in Northern Ireland in 2013.

    It is very appropriate that Mayor Cadart has donated one of his shirts for the Amphitrite Project. Mayor Cadart, was formally awarded with the prestigious French medal - the National Order of Merit (l’Ordre national du Mérite) in Hobart on 8 March this year.

    The medal was presented to Mayor Cadart by the Ambassador of France, His Excellency Mr Stéphane Romatet, at an official reception at the Henry Jones Art Hotel, Hobart. The Ambassador made a special visit to Tasmania to present the prestigious award as the French Republic’s official representative in Australia. 

    http://www.bertrandcadart.com.au/client-assets/press-releases/media-release-mayor-awarded-prestigious-medal.pdf

    Mayor Cadart chose this particular shirt as it holds significant emotional, family values. 

    The shirt has ‘French’ cuffs. The cufflinks were chosen carefully. Their Fleur de Lys being the emblem of French royalty. These cufflinks can be viewed  in the attached photo.

    Mayor Cadart has been photographed wearing two medals that illustrate the pertinent links influencing artist Christina Henri’s decision to create bonnets from THIS particular shirt.

    The blue ribbon medal, the La médaille du Mérite National was awarded to Mayor Cadart on 8 March 2014, by the President of the French republic, for services rendered to France whilst living abroad. 
    The red ribbon medal is: La médaille du mérite et du bien. This medal wasawarded to Mayor Cadart in 2013 for services to his country of birth - France.
    Thanks very much to professional photographer Owen Hughes.
    Christina Henri’s intent is for bonnets symbolising the 102 women, their 12 children and 2 unborn babies to form a contemporary art memorial in the land where the bodies were buried. (Boulogne-sur-Mer, France).
    At the moment French women living both in France and abroad are sewing beautiful bonnets in memory of the 102 women whose lives were cut short when the Amphitrite sank.
    For more on this tragic maritime disaster:
    — 2 weeks ago

    Christina Henri met with Ann Ricketts yesterday and was presented with a beautiful bonnet tribute made in memory of Ann Levy to be part of the Roses from the Heart Memorial. Ann Levy is the great, great grandmother of Ann’s husband Chris.

    Ann Levy has Irish connections as she was born in Armagh, Northern Ireland. Her trade was ‘housemaid’. She married Thomas Dunlevy and they were living in Manchester when Thomas died accidently in May 1843 leaving Ann, a widow with two young children. Ann was tried in December in 1843 in Manchester. She left Woolwich England on the convict ship Angelina with her two children in April 1844 and arrived in Hobart town, Van Diemen’s Land in August 1844 . A few days after arriving her children were placed in the St Johns Orphan School. It is hard to imagine how Ann would have felt being forcibly separated from her two children who had accompanied her to this land so far from home. No doubt Ann would have expected that at the very least she would have her two children with her but she was wrong.

    It must have been very strange for Ann to eventually find herself working at the Orphan School in New Town where she was eventually granted permission to marry John Hill. Aged 32 Ann married John Hill at St Georges Church, Battery Point on 11 September 1848. St Georges Church remains - the church spire still dominates the Battery Point skyline today.

    On the 20 July 1850 Ann’s son Thomas was discharged form the Queens Orphan School into her care. On the 28 April 1852 Ann’s daughter Margaret was discharged from the same institution (Queens Orphanage) into Ann’s care. One can only wonder if the scars of the Orphan School experience ever healed.

    What we know about Ann’s life is that she was the mother of six children. Three children married and descendants of these children live on today and contribute to the Australian community.

    In making the bonnet tribute Ann Ricketts included the names of the two children who travelled to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) with Ann in memory of their lives.

    The stitching Ann used on the bonnet tribute for Ann Levy are as follows:

    Rose Bullion Stitch: This stitching is used on the three roses above Ann Levy’s name, a rose each for Ann and her two young children Margaret and Thomas.

    Stem Stitch: This stitch is used for the outline of the rose stems and leaves and for the name of the convict ship the Angelina and the date 1844. Stem stitch was used to highlight, using green thread, the shamrock pattern on the lace to represent Ireland, Ann’s homeland.

    Chain Stitch: This stitch was used for the names of Ann Levy and her two children Margaret (aged 6) and Thomas (aged 2).

    French Knots: This stitch was used to create the forget-me-nots on the back of the bonnet around the children’s names.

    Back Stitch: This stitch was used in the hand sewing together of the bonnet and to attach the lace ribbons.

    Herringbone Stitch: This stitching was used to hem the turned under edges of the bonnet.

    Open Buttonhole Stitch: This stitching was used to hem the open edges of the bonnet.

    The bonnet itself was made from a piece of 50 year old sheeting.

    Thanks to Ann for this lovely symbolism of Ann Levy’s life. 

    — 2 months ago
    This is the fourth year in a row that Cobh Tourism and the Cobh Heritage Centre have supported Tasmanian artist Christina Henri’s ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ ceremony. As on other occasions the ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ was linked with a visit from the Dawn Princess liner carrying 2000 passengers. Passengers are invited to make a bonnet tribute for a convict lass and the bonnets are blessed in special ceremonies. Through these performances Christina highlights the need to remember the exiled women whose value to the social and economic contribution to the Nation was deliberately ignored for generations.

The ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ ceremony Christina holds in Cobh showcases the Irish women exiled to Australia (1788-1853) especially those women who were transported from the quayside at Cobh, County Cork.

There is a permanent installation of bonnets at the Cobh Heritage Centre that visitors to the iconic site can view. These bonnets are for the convict women aboard the Neva, the ship that sank off the coast of King Island. The Neva sailed from Cobh on the 8 January 1835 bound for New South Wales, Australia. It was shipwrecked off the coast of King Island on the 13 May 1835. 150 female convicts and their 34 children faced drowning. Only six of the women aboard and ten of the 26 crew survived the ordeal. The women who survived were Ellen Galvin from Limerick, Rose Ann Hyland from County Down, Mary Slattery from County Kerry, Rose Ann Dunn from County Cavan, 
Ann Cullen from County Laois (formerly Queens County) and Margaret Drury from County Roscommon.
Tasmanian Victor Malham is a descendant of Margaret Drury. Victor’s wife Jill has sewn a bonnet tribute for Margaret Drury which forms part of the Roses from the Heart memorial.

Christina took calico to King Island where the material was washed in the water close to where the Neva sank. The cloth was then dried on the grass near the plaque that was laid in memory of the victims of the Neva. Some of the victims lie buried beneath this plaque. Christina invited women on King Island to assist her to cut out bonnets from the fabric. The resulting cut out bonnet pieces were then sewn by members of the Irish Guild of Embroiderers in Dublin. Members sewed and embellished the bonnets which were ‘Blessed’ at a special ceremony at St Colemans Cathedral, Cobh on 20 October 2013. See:  http://rosesfromtheheart.tumblr.com/post/64617969931/well-what-a-day-thanks-to-everyone-who-made-the…

This year Cal McCarthy co author of the Wreck of the Neva: The Horrifying Fate of a Convict Ship and the Irish Women Aboard by Kevin Todd and Cal McCarthy (Sep 18, 2013) spoke at the ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ held at the Cobh Heritage Centre as part of Australia Day. 
 
Textile artist Dee Newson who lives on the Isle of Mann has made a bonnet tribute for Honora Buckley. Honora, like Dee Newson, was born in Cork. Honora was tried in Cork and sentenced to transportation to Australia aboard the Neva with her young baby William. Neither survived thedisaster. 
 
During Christina’s time in Ireland last year she sewed the 26 babies bonnets, along with her friend, accomplished seamstress,  Margaret McBride from County Down. The shirts from which the christening bonnets were sewn were sourced from within Ireland. 

Christina was presented with the beautifully created bonnets in Dublin. The bonnets were then taken to Cobh in readiness for the ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’. A number of Irish Guild of embroiderers Dublin members travelled to Cobh, as did Margaret McBride, to be part of the special ceremony at St Coleman’s Cathedral and the Cobh Heritage Centre. Members of the Bedizzole Italian Marching Band took part in the performance and added to the significance of the event. Students from a number of local schools and members of the Cobh Community carried bonnets through the town of Cobh after the ‘Blessing’ to the Cobh Heritage Centre where the bonnets now reside.
 
These bonnets can be viewed at the Cohb Heritage Centre.
 
The Neva was Tasmania’s (formerly named Van Diemen’s Land) second worst shipwreck. A terrible loss of so many lives.

    This is the fourth year in a row that Cobh Tourism and the Cobh Heritage Centre have supported Tasmanian artist Christina Henri’s ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ ceremony. As on other occasions the ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ was linked with a visit from the Dawn Princess liner carrying 2000 passengers. Passengers are invited to make a bonnet tribute for a convict lass and the bonnets are blessed in special ceremonies. Through these performances Christina highlights the need to remember the exiled women whose value to the social and economic contribution to the Nation was deliberately ignored for generations.

    The ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ ceremony Christina holds in Cobh showcases the Irish women exiled to Australia (1788-1853) especially those women who were transported from the quayside at Cobh, County Cork.
    There is a permanent installation of bonnets at the Cobh Heritage Centre that visitors to the iconic site can view. These bonnets are for the convict women aboard the Neva, the ship that sank off the coast of King Island. The Neva sailed from Cobh on the 8 January 1835 bound for New South Wales, Australia. It was shipwrecked off the coast of King Island on the 13 May 1835. 150 female convicts and their 34 children faced drowning. Only six of the women aboard and ten of the 26 crew survived the ordeal. The women who survived were Ellen Galvin from Limerick, Rose Ann Hyland from County Down, Mary Slattery from County Kerry, Rose Ann Dunn from County Cavan, 
    Ann Cullen from County Laois (formerly Queens County) and Margaret Drury from County Roscommon.

    Tasmanian Victor Malham is a descendant of Margaret Drury. Victor’s wife Jill has sewn a bonnet tribute for Margaret Drury which forms part of the Roses from the Heart memorial.
    Christina took calico to King Island where the material was washed in the water close to where the Neva sank. The cloth was then dried on the grass near the plaque that was laid in memory of the victims of the Neva. Some of the victims lie buried beneath this plaque. Christina invited women on King Island to assist her to cut out bonnets from the fabric. The resulting cut out bonnet pieces were then sewn by members of the Irish Guild of Embroiderers in Dublin. Members sewed and embellished the bonnets which were ‘Blessed’ at a special ceremony at St Colemans Cathedral, Cobh on 20 October 2013. See:  http://rosesfromtheheart.tumblr.com/post/64617969931/well-what-a-day-thanks-to-everyone-who-made-the…
    This year Cal McCarthy co author of the Wreck of the Neva: The Horrifying Fate of a Convict Ship and the Irish Women Aboard by Kevin Todd and Cal McCarthy (Sep 18, 2013) spoke at the ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’ held at the Cobh Heritage Centre as part of Australia Day. 
     
    Textile artist Dee Newson who lives on the Isle of Mann has made a bonnet tribute for Honora Buckley. Honora, like Dee Newson, was born in Cork. Honora was tried in Cork and sentenced to transportation to Australia aboard the Neva with her young baby William. Neither survived thedisaster. 
     
    During Christina’s time in Ireland last year she sewed the 26 babies bonnets, along with her friend, accomplished seamstress,  Margaret McBride from County Down. The shirts from which the christening bonnets were sewn were sourced from within Ireland. 
    Christina was presented with the beautifully created bonnets in Dublin. The bonnets were then taken to Cobh in readiness for the ‘Blessing of the Bonnets’. A number of Irish Guild of embroiderers Dublin members travelled to Cobh, as did Margaret McBride, to be part of the special ceremony at St Coleman’s Cathedral and the Cobh Heritage Centre. Members of the Bedizzole Italian Marching Band took part in the performance and added to the significance of the event. Students from a number of local schools and members of the Cobh Community carried bonnets through the town of Cobh after the ‘Blessing’ to the Cobh Heritage Centre where the bonnets now reside.
     
    These bonnets can be viewed at the Cohb Heritage Centre.
     
    The Neva was Tasmania’s (formerly named Van Diemen’s Land) second worst shipwreck. A terrible loss of so many lives.
    — 2 months ago
    UK Embroider’s Guild CEO and members assist Christina Henri’s ‘Roses from the Heart’ Memorial

    Christina Henri is so pleased to have the involvement of members from the UK Embroiderer’s Guild who are creating wonderful bonnet tributes for the ‘Roses from the Heart’ Memorial.

    In October 4, 2014 a stalwart supporter of the Roses from the Heart Memorial, UK Embroidery Guild member, Norma Bean unexpectedly died. Christina was devastated that Norma was unable to see the last part of the Roses from the Heart journey unfold.

    In memory of Norma’s enthusiastic contribution members of the UK Embroiderer’s Guild are making a major effort to see the realisation of the Memorial’s completion. Bonnets tributes are being made with not only an empathy for the life of the woman the bonnet remembers but also in memory of the passion Norma Bean displayed as she assisted Christina with promoting the Memorial throughout the UK.

    Norma’s family remain involved in the ‘Roses from the Heart’ Memorial and will attend, and take part in, bonnet events held in the UK during 2015.

    Christina Henri is extremely grateful for the support of CEO, Terry Murphy and all members taking part in the Roses from the Heart Memorial.

    Here are some further links:

    LATEST NEWS

    http://www.emreg.org.uk/about-us/bonnets/bonnet-project-2014

    — 2 months ago
    #http://www.embroiderersguild.com